The purpose of this report is to explain how the CIPD HR profession map professional areas and bands define the HR profession and why the behaviours are essential to being and effective HR professional

The purpose of this report is to explain how the CIPD HR profession map professional areas and bands define the HR profession and why the behaviours are essential to being and effective HR professional.

The HR profession map (HRPM) was created by CIPD in 2009. It sets out the professional competence for HR staff, and the required underpinning skills, knowledge and behaviour. There are ten professional areas, eight behaviours and four bands of competence. The HRPM allows organisations and individuals to benchmark themselves and see where further development is required. It also helps employees see how they fit into their organisation.

CIPD say the professional areas of the map “describe what you need to do (activities) and what you need to know (knowledge) for each area of the HR profession at four bands of professional competence.” CIPD A

Two of the ten professional areas are at the core of the HR profession and are fundamental to any HR professional, regardless of their role or band of competence. These are;
• Leading HR – This requires HR professionals to “act as a role-model leader and to support, develop and measure the wider workforce to maximise the contribution the HR function makes to an organisation.
• Insights, Strategies and Solutions – This requires HR professionals to develop an understanding of the organisation and apply this to use adapt strategy and establish solutions ensuring the organisation is always at the forefront of their actions.
The other eight areas form the main functions delivered by HR. They are; Service delivery and Information, Organisation and Design, Organisation Development, Resourcing and Talent Planning, Learning and Development, Performance and Reward, Employee Engagement and Employee Relations.
The bands set out the knowledge and skills required for the professional areas and behaviours and range from 1-4. As an individual develops their HR career and moves from role to role they should progress through the bands as the bands represent the HR hierarchy. The bands describe what is required to transition through the levels and provides clear guidance advising; where time is spent, what is important in the new role, the new skill focus and what the HR professionals need to let go from the previous role, for example a director would not be expected to deal with hands on operational work. There is a positive correlation between the band and level of responsibility, as the band increase as does the level of responsibility. The table below shows the role associated with each band.