The Visayan broadbill is formerly known as Eurylaimus samarensis

The Visayan broadbill is formerly known as Eurylaimus samarensis. It is a 15-cm bird with green eyes surrounded by a bright sky-blue fleshy fold of skin. It’s broad, flattened and slightly hooked bill is also pale blue and its crown is purple with a grayish collar. The back is turning to a bright chestnut on the rump and tail from purple. The male and female are the same, except the female has a pure white breast and belly. It is originated from the central part of the Philippines specifically the islands of Samar, Leyte and Bohol. It is frequently in areas with limestone outcrops and found in subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. Most of the species are insectivores but some are fruit-eating species. A buzzing sound (wing trill) is used for call most often during the early morning and late afternoon. It is used in courtship as signals between mates and also for territorial defense. They communicate using a variety of mating and territorial displays. The Visayan broadbill is threatened due to habitat loss. The International Union for Conservation of Nature lists the Visayan broadbill as one of the three species of broadbill as vulnerable. It is protected in Rajah Sikatuna National Park in Bohol and continuing management activities to minimize habitat disturbance.